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3817 McMasters Ave • Hannibal, MO • 573-221-1033

Education

Educational Opportunities in Hannibal, MO

Hannibal area school districts are rated "accredited with distinction in performance" by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Additional accreditation comes from the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools at the Hannibal Career Center. In addition, several regional educational facilities offer customized training programs to ensure a steady source of qualified workers.

Hannibal is home to Hannibal LaGrange University, a four-year private Christian University. Hannibal-LaGrange offers more than 34 majors on the baccalaureate level. In addition, several pre-professional programs are offered on the associate level. An honors program is available for gifted and highly motivated students.

In addition, Moberly Area Community College operates a campus site in Hannibal. The MACC - Hannibal Area Higher Education Center offers general education and career/technical courses in a 17,000+ square foot facility. MACC offers more than 40 areas of study.

Moberly Area Community College

Moberly Area Community College (MACC) serves over 6,000 students in Northeast Missouri and offers career and technical training courses in a variety of sectors. Below you will find examples of the types of programs offered with links to the course descriptions.

Architectural & Mechanical Design Courses

Architectural & Mechanical Design

AMD 101 Engineering Design 2-2-3

This course introduces students to technical drawing components and the ASME standards associated therein. Topics covered include orthographic projections, dimensioning and notes, sectional views, auxiliary views, Assembly drawings, isometric drawings, tolerancing, threads and fasteners, along with drafting conventions and standards associated with technical drawings. Students are introduced to the components of a technical drawing while gaining an introduction to 2D drawing software.

AMD 102 Technical Drawing 2-2-3

Technical Drawing is a continuation of Engineering Drawing. The student is expected to build on the skills previously acquired and acquire new skills in the areas of working drawings and details. Comprehensive drawings will be assigned that utilize the students’ acquired skills and knowledge of drafting conventions and the operation of CAD. Assignments will be completed on the computer and plotted for grading. This class is primarily a mechanical design class. Prerequisites: AMD101 and AMD112. (SP) Prior to fall 2015, this course was listed as DDT102.

AMD 110 Industrial Print Reading 2-2-3

This course covers how to read blueprints, diagrams, and symbols commonly found in the industrial maintenance setting. Topics include use of measuring tools, shop math review, orthographic projections, auxiliary views, lines, surfaces, and title blocks. Additional topics covered are dimensions and tolerances, sectional views, pictorial drawings and specifications, welding prints, instrumentation and control fluid power diagrams, tables, and symbols used in industrial mechanical maintenance. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be certified in Module 2, Quality Practices and Measurement, with the nationally-recognized Manufacturing Skill Standards Council Certified Production Technician certificate. The student can receive the full Certified Production Technician (CPT) certificate upon successful completion of IND100, IND101, and AMD110. (FA)

AMD 112 Computer-Aided Design I 2-2-3

CAD I is an introductory computerized drafting course using CAD software. Software is used to create, modify, store, and manage drawings and related files. Students will have extensive hands-on instruction using microcomputers, printers, plotters, and CAD software. Prior to fall 2015, this course was listed as DDT112.

AMD 211 Computer Aided Design II 2-2-3

AMD211 is a continuation of computerized drafting using CAD software. The course includes advanced features of software and an introduction to 3D drawings. Students will have extensive hands-on instruction using microcomputers, printers, plotters, and CAD software. Prerequisite: AMD112. (SP) Prior to fall 2015, this course was listed as DDT211.

AMD 223 Civil Engineering Design 2-2-3

This course is an introduction to civil drafting technology in order to provide the student with theories, concepts, and skills that form the foundation work done by civil engineering companies. Prerequisite: AMD112 or instructor approval. Prior to fall 2015, this course was listed as DDT223.

AMD 225 Architectural Design I 2-2-3

This course will build on skills acquired in beginning drafting classes. The student will utilize CAD equipment and software in a thorough study of all aspects of residential construction: space requirements, materials and methods of construction, ecotecture, mechanical and electrical, non-conventional construction, building codes, and cost estimating. Prerequisite: AMD112 or instructor approval. Prior to fall 2015, this course was listed as DDT225.

AMD 226 Architectural Design II 2-2-3

Architectural CAD II is a continuation of Architectural CAD I. The student will learn residential electrical applications, plumbing, climate control, new products and methods of construction, and perspective and presentation drawings, along with career opportunities in the architectural field. Students will utilize CAD in adding these components to house plans. Prerequisite: AMD225. Prior to fall 2015, this course was listed as DDT226.

AMD 227 Architectural Design III 2-2-3

This course has been designed to give the student an introduction to essential commands and features of architectural software. The student will gain knowledge and experience with examples and applications of commands for development of both residential and commercial buildings. Prerequisite: AMD226 or instructor approval. (SP) Prior to fall 2015, this course was listed as DDT227.

AMD 228 Structural Design 2-2-3

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the tools, experience and confidence needed to succeed in a structural consulting engineering firm and/or architectural/ engineering firm as a structural technician. The students will gain an understanding of proper structural drafting and design techniques involving steel, wood, and concrete. Prerequisites: AMD112 and MTH130. (FA) Prior to fall 2015, this course was listed as DDT228.

AMD 232 Architectural and Mechanical Design Capstone Project 2-2-3

This course will introduce the theory and practical applications of project management. The student will develop, plan, manage, and present a final project. The student will be required to develop a complete set of professional-quality working drawings in conjunction with the application of project management. A portfolio of the student’s completed work from all other courses will be developed and presented with the final project. Prerequisites: AMD223, AMD226, and AMD228. Prior to fall 2015, this course was listed as DDT232.

AMD 250 Design Concepts 2-2-3

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of design concepts and processes involved in developing a sound product. The student will participate in solving design problems following the proper process and documenting their solutions as they develop a product. The student will understand the tools needed to develop an efficient design process regardless of the product being developed. Products will be designed utilizing 3D Models which will then be developed into prototypes. Prerequisites: MTH130 or MTH140, AMD101, and AMD211. (SP) Prior to fall 2015, this course was listed as DDT250.

AMD 295 Architectural and Mechanical Design Internship 0-(6-18)-(2-6)

This course is designed to provide students real-life work experiences through on-the job training with a field-related cooperating employer in the student’s declared major. Students will be supervised by the business/industry sponsor and report to the Director of Career and Technical Programs or assigned faculty member. The position may be paid or unpaid. Students must complete a minimum of 45 contact hours per credit hour per semester. Course is variable credits and may be repeated for up to six credit hours. Prerequisites: Minimum of 30 credit hours, with at least 18 credits of core classes in the program area, 2.50 GPA, and/or approval from the Dean of Workforce Development and Technical Education or Director of Career and Technical Programs.

AMD 299 Special Studies in Architectural and Mechanical Design (1 to 6)-0-(1 to 6)

This course will consist of specialized study in areas of the department which are not covered in-depth in courses already offered. Students may take no more than 6 credit hours of special studies in any one discipline. (IN) Prior to fall 2015, this course was listed as DDT299.

Engineering Courses

Engineering

EGN 201 Statics 3-0-3

Students will apply principles of mechanics to engineering problems of equilibrium. Topics include resolution and composition of forces, moments of inertia, and analysis of structure and machines. Prerequisite/ Corequisite: Completion with a grade of "C" or better or concurrent enrollment in both PHY201 and MTH203. (SP)

Industrial Electronics/Electricity Technology Courses

Industrial Electronics/Electricity Technology

EET 100 DC/AC Electronics 2-2-3

This course provides the fundamental principles of DC/AC electrical and symbols as well as construction techniques in the use of electrical cables, conduit, and busways. Reference to the National Electric Code will be used throughout the course to provide proper safety and application techniques. The course also includes construction, control, and maintenance of AC and DC motors, generators, and transformers. Classroom projects will involve quoting and project costing using electrical supply catalogs, engineering specifications, and examples of standard operating procedures used in the industrial environment. (FA)

EET 101 Industrial Electricity 2-2-3

This course includes a general review of power circuitry, terms, and electrical symbols as well as construction techniques in the use of electrical cables, conduit, and busways. Typical industrial electrical power systems will be discussed with reference to the National Electric Code for proper safety. The course also includes construction, control, and maintenance of AC and DC motors, generators, and transformers. Classroom projects will involve typical motor, transformer, and other industrial wiring techniques. Motor speed control along with other industrial control topics will be covered in hands-on labs. Prerequisite: EET100. (SP)

EET 110 Digital Electronics and Control 2-2-3

This course will provide participants with the background fundamentals of computer logic, computer language numbering systems, Boolean algebra, and digital control techniques. Participants will learn both theory and practical application of circuits related to complex circuits found in practical digital systems. Topics will include introduction to digital electronics, binary logic and logic gates, numbering systems, microprocessor control systems, basic microprocessor programming, digital systems, and analog to digital circuits. Emphasis will be on hands-on applications via functional labs and common troubleshooting techniques. Prerequisite: EET100 or instructor approval. (SP)

EET 111 Electric Motor Controls 2-2-3

Participants will learn the practical application of electrical motor control principles used for installation, troubleshooting, and maintenance in an industrial setting. Topics include interpretation of electrical symbols, drawings, relay, and ladder logic diagrams; motor starters, contactors, timers, and relays; solenoids and switches; AC single and multi-phase motors; transformers and overcurrent protection; electrical distribution and switching; and solid-state signaling and control devices. This course includes both theory and hands-on, practical lab experiences. Prerequisites: EET100 and MTH130, MTH140 or MTH142.

EET 213 Process Control and Instrumentation 2-2-3

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of process control and instrumentation as it relates to industrial applications. Emphasis will be given to use of symbols, drawings, control measurement, tuning, and maintenance of these systems. Hands-on experience supporting the emphasized areas will be gained via lab sessions utilizing MACC’s instrumentation and controls trainer. Prerequisite: EET214 or instructor approval. (FA)

EET 214 Programmable Logic Controllers 2-2-3

In this lecture/lab course, participants will learn the basic concepts, capabilities, hardware and system architecture, ladder logic programming, editing, and troubleshooting of programmable logic controllers. Emphasis is on knowledge and skills required by industrial maintenance technicians in an industrial environment. Pre- or corequisite: EET111. (FA)

EET 216 Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers 2-2-3

This course will provide an understanding of the enhanced instructions/functionality of programmable logic controllers (PLC’s). Students will be introduced to the math, file, sequencer, and shift register instructions as they are applied in an industrial PLC based control systems. Also, analog input/ output configuration and programming will be covered. Hands-on experience supporting these enhanced instructions/ functions will be gained. Prerequisite: EET214 or instructor approval. (SP)

EET 220 Robotics and Integrated Manufacturing 2-2-3

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of automated principles and practices relating to industrial automated manufacturing. Emphasis will be placed on components which make up integrated systems such as robots, robotic I/O, robotic servos, positional control, programmable logic controllers (PLC), vision systems, sensors, and interconnectivity/wiring techniques required for integrated manufacturing. Lab sessions will allow for hands on experiences that will support the emphasized areas. Prerequisite: EET214 or instructor approval. (SP)

Industrial Technology Courses

Industrial Technology

IND 100 Industrial Safety & Manufacturing Processes: CPT 1 & 3   3-0-3

This course will have two main areas of emphasis: Safety and Manufacturing Principles. The safety emphasis includes safety organization, fire safety, materials handling, federal regulations, and current issues in industrial safety. The student will receive an OSHA 10 Card if they successfully complete the requirements. The course will also introduce the student to the manufacturing industry including industrial terminology; lean manufacturing; material processes; Six Sigma; supply chain management; and design, engineering, and quality management systems including the concepts of the Toyota Production System. Students will also participate in job shadowing experiences with local industries. Upon successful completion of this course, the student can be certified in Module 1 Safety, and Module 3 Manufacturing Processes and Production, with the nationally recognized Manufacturing Skill Standards Council Certified Production Technician (CPT) certificate. The student can receive the full CPT certification upon successful completion of IND100, IND101, and AMD110. (FA)

IND 101 Fundamentals of Industrial Maintenance: CPT 4   2-2-3

This course provides a basic survey of industrial and preventive maintenance concepts and practices used by industrial maintenance mechanics in the installation, troubleshooting, and repair of mechanical systems and machines found in industry. Topics include mechanics’ tools, practices, and safety; basic types; operating concepts and principles of mechanical equipment and systems-gears, bearings, seals, mechanical drive systems; and basic fluid power. Course includes selection and use of proper lubricants by application, mechanical troubleshooting, and methods of scheduling preventive maintenance. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be certified in Module 4, Maintenance Awareness, with the nationally-recognized Manufacturing Skill Standards Council Certified Production Technician certificate. The student can receive the full Certified Production Technician (CPT) certificate upon successful completion of IND100, IND101, and AMD110. (FA)

IND 105 Fluid Power Principles 2-2-3

This course addresses the practical application of fluid power principles used in the installation, maintenance, and troubleshooting of industrial hydraulic and pneumatic systems and equipment. Topics include basic hydraulic and pneumatic principles and theory, identification of systems components and equipment, interpretation of fluid power symbols and drawings, and the application of fluid power knowledge and skills to industrial maintenance and troubleshooting.

IND 120 Technical Report Writing 3-0-3

IND120 covers techniques of collecting and presenting scientific data for formal and informal reports. Technical papers are studied, and presentation skills are developed. Prerequisite: Eligible placement score.

IND 200 Mechanical Systems 2-2-3

This course will provide the student with a basic understanding of mechanical systems found in industrial and manufacturing facilities. Topics will include troubleshooting, maintenance, and repair of these systems, along with preventive maintenance techniques. Emphasis will be on motor and drive systems such as belts, pulleys, chains, gears, and various coupling components. Common mechanical linkages will also be discussed. Hands-on labs will cover various mechanical systems and allow the student to develop related skills. Prerequisite: IND101 or instructor approval. (FA)

IND 295 Industrial Technology Internship 0-(6-18)-(2-6)

This course is designed to provide students real-life work experiences through on-the job training with a field-related cooperating employer in the student’s declared major. Students will be supervised by the business/industry sponsor and report to the Director of Career and Technical Programs or assigned faculty member. The position may be paid or unpaid. Students must complete a minimum of 45 contact hours per credit hour per semester. Course is variable credits and may be repeated for up to six credit hours. Prerequisites: Minimum of 30 credit hours, with at least 18 credits of core classes in the program area, 2.50 GPA, and/or approval from the Dean of Workforce Development and Technical Education or Director of Career and Technical Programs.

IND 299 Special Studies in Industrial Technology (1 to 6)-0-(1 to 6)

This course will consist of specialized study in areas of the department, which are not covered in-depth in courses already offered. Students may take no more than six credit hours of special studies in any one discipline. (IN)

Machine Tool Courses

Machine Tool

MSP 101 Machine Tool I 2-2-3

This is an introductory course in the study of various metalworking machines with emphasis on the lathe and lathe operations. The course also includes an introduction to the milling machine and surface grinder. (FA)

MSP 102 Machine Tool II  2-2-3

MSP 102 is a further study of metalworking machines and their operation with emphasis on the surface grinder and milling machine. The student will have an opportunity to create, select, plan, and construct projects and instructional material. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MSP 101 or instructor approval. (SP)

MSP 220 CNC Programming 2-2-3

This course will teach the student to write G & M code CNC programs for CNC lathes and CNC mills. The course will cover the most common G & M codes for Fanuc/Haas type machines, including linear and circulator interpolation, drilling, hold making, roughing and finishing, and threading canned cycles. The student will also write and troubleshoot programs for a CNC mill and CNC lathe using a programing editing software and on a CNC control.

MSP 222 CNC Operations 2-2-3

This course will enable the beginning CNC student to apply fundamental principles and applications of setup and operation to a CNC lathe, CNA mill, and Omax waterjet. The course will cover the reading and editing of CNC programs, setup, and maintenance of tool holders, tooling and work holding, and adjustments of work and tool offsets. Students will also perform common inspection processes and produce a production run of parts to the given print tolerance. Prerequisites: MSP101 or instructor approval. (SP)

Welding Courses

Welding

WLD 101 Welding I 2-2-3

This course is an introduction to basic skills necessary to become a welder. Oxy-fuel cutting, GMAW (gaw metal arc welding), and SMAW on plate will be performed in addition to weld symbol interpretation and safety. Time permitting, other processes may be explored. This class utilizes certified American Welding Society (AWS) curriculum.

WLD 102 Welding II 2-2-3

This course is a continuation of Welding I. Students will expand knowledge gained from level 1 and begin to learn more about welding prints and structural materials. Students will learn ways to identify welding problems, their causes, and corrective action to take. GTAW will be performed in various positions on ferrous and nonferrous materials. Students will continue to learn how to SMAW in various positions. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in WLD101 or instructor approval.

WLD 299 Special Studies in Welding and Metals Technology (1 to 6)-0-(1 to 6)

This course will consist of specialized study in areas of the department, which are not covered in-depth in courses already offered. Students may take no more than six credit hours of special studies in any one discipline. (IN)

Hannibal Career and Technical Center

Hannibal Career and Technical Center (HCTC) serves students from seven sending districts in Northeast Missouri and offers career and technical training courses in a variety of sectors. Below you will find examples of the types of programs offered with links to the course descriptions.

Design Drafting Courses

Design Drafting

Students selecting this program will develop proficiency in board drafting and computer-aided drafting. Students are able to prepare drawings for manufacturing and fabrication. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) drafting and design standards will be taught and reinforced as students prepare drawings in both 2D and 3D using AutoCAD, Mechanical Desktop, and applications software.

Throughout this course of study, students will be required to use sketches, notes, technical literature, and personal research to complete assignments.

Machine Tool Courses

Machine Tool

This course is designed to teach students skills appropriate for machine shops in the workforce.  Students will be given theoretical and practical application in the areas of lathe and millwork, drilling and grinding.  The successful machine tool student will develop basic skills and knowledge in blueprint reading, heat treating, set up procedures and machine shop safety.  As you become more advanced you will learn the setup and machining processes which also include operating the Computerized Numerical Control system (CNC) as well as tool designing.

Welding Courses

Welding

Our welding program is designed to be a two-year course.  High school students will earn 3 class credits per year and adult students will earn a total of 465 clock hour credit.  Any class credit questions you may have can be answered by our financial aid officer or guidance counselor.

As a student in our welding program you will learn several types of welding processes.  You will become familiar with Oxy-Fuel welding, cutting and brazing, Shield Metal Arc (Stick), Gas Metal Arc (MIG or Wire), Flux Cored Wire welding, Gas Tungsten Arc (TIG or Hili-Arc) and to include Plasma and Carbon-Air cutting.

Students will learn the proper welding processes to use for given jobs and how to identify different types of materials to use for those jobs.  A great deal of class time is devoted to building projects and doing various kinds of repairs and maintenance welding.